A People’s Journey, A Nation’s Story

Welcome to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture

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The museum’s history galleries will be closed on Saturday, January 18 while we inspect and repair light fixtures. 

We will temporarily suspend same-day online passes to manage the flow of visitors while the history galleries are closed.  Visitors, who wish to change the date of their visit, may use their passes for another time when the museum is open. 

We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused and look forward to welcoming you on your next visit.

Visiting the Museum

Open everyday 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m., except Dec.25
Museum Address
1400 Constitution Ave NW,
Washington, DC 20560
Ph. 1-844-750-3012
Admission is free. Passes may be required.

Walk-up to the museum without a pass on weekdays beginning at 10am. Timed entry passes are only required on weekends and for groups of 10 or more. Learn More!

More info about passes

 

Museum News and Highlights

A black-and-white photograph of a African American male holding
01/03

The People's Holiday

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The Sub-Committee of Management and Counsel of the Grand United Order of Odd Fellows (1907-1908), January 1908
02/03

National Museum of African American History and Culture Opens New Exhibition, “We Return Fighting”

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Portrait of Alvin Ailey with Judith Jamison, Linda Kent, and Dudley Williams in dance studio, 1973
03/03

National Museum of African American History and Culture’s Alvin Ailey Photography Collection Is Now Available to the Public

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Featured Exhibition

We Return Fighting

We Return Fighting is a 4,200 sq. ft. temporary exhibition opening at the National Museum of African American History and Culture on December 13, 2019.
EXPLORE EXHIBITION
Mourning the Death of Martin Luther King Jr.

The assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4, 1968, dashed the hopes of black Americans for the commitment of white America to racial equality. White Americans respected him more than other black leaders, but his opposition to the Vietnam War infuriated many. His continued insistence on nonviolent protests frustrated black activists. But in 1968 he still led the struggle for civil rights. “The murder of King changed the whole dynamic of the country,” recalled Black Panther Kathleen...

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Explore the Collection

Discover signature objects from the Museum's collection
Pinback button featuring Martin Luther King Jr.

Pinback button featuring Martin Luther King Jr.

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Placard from memorial march reading

Placard from memorial march reading "HONOR KING: END RACISM!"

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Congressional Gold Medal for Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King

Congressional Gold Medal for Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King

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The African American experience is the lens through which we understand what it is to be an American.

Lonnie G. Bunch III Founding Director, NMAAHC