Museum News

African Americans and the Advertising Industry Series Leads the National Museum of African American History and Culture July Programming

June 30, 2017

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture kicks off its July programing with a two-day public program series on African Americans and the advertising industry titled “Represent,” with events starting July 1.

The series begins with the TED Talk-style symposium, Represent: African Americans and the Advertising Industry, Saturday, July 1, at 3 p.m. in the museum’s Oprah Winfrey Theater. Renetta McCann, chief talent officer of Publicist Communications NA at Leo Burnett USA, will moderate the program featuring Carol Williams, USA 2017 Advertising Hall of Fame inductee; Kristina Jenkins, chief strategy officer at Zambezi; and Stephanie Capparell, Wall Street Journal writer and author of the Real Pepsi Challenge. They will share their perspectives on working in the advertising industry and explore the relationship between African American culture and advertising. Registration is required.

The public program series continues at 6:30 p.m. with Cinema + Conversation: Boomerang 25th Anniversary. The program will feature Boomerang director Reginald Hudlin with George Alexander, producer, former editor-at-large at Black Enterprise magazine and author of Why We Make Movies: Black Filmmakers. Since its release July 1, 1992, the romantic comedy Boomerang, set in a fictional black advertising agency, has inspired an entire generation of marketing and advertising professionals. Registration is required.

On Sunday, July 2, the public program series concludes at 2 p.m. with Cinema + Conversation: Putney Swope in the Oprah Winfrey Theater. The program will feature director and writer Robert Downey Sr. in conversation with comedian and writer Jordan Carlos (The Nightly Show With Larry Wilmore, Guy Code, The Colbert Report).

The 1969 cult classic Putney Swope is satirical view of blacks in advertising and race in Hollywood, after a group of activists take over an advertising agency. Registration is required.

On Sunday, July 16, at 3 p.m. the quarterly programs series Culinary Cousins will present culinary historian Jessica Harris to discuss the decade-long career of Leah Chase, co-founder of the renowned Dookie Chase Restaurant in New Orleans. Registration for this program is Registration is recommended.

The Clement A. Price Lecture Series: The Summer of Black Power: The Uprising in Newark Reconsidered concludes July programming Wednesday, July 26, from 4 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. This is the first of two symposia named in honor of the late Clement A. Price, Ph.D., founding director of the Institute on Ethnicity, Culture and the Modern Experience at Rutgers-Newark University and member of the National Museum of African American History and Culture’s Scholarly Advisory Committee. In the tradition of the Marion Thompson Wright lecture series, which Price established in 1981, the museum will organize an evening-long discussion, examining the economic, and social conditions that lead to days of rioting in July 1967.

Media Contact(s): 

Jermaine House    (202) 633-9495; housej@si.edu 
Shrita Hernandez  (202) 633-5089; hernandezs@si.edu 

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The National Museum of African American History and Culture will be a place where all Americans can learn about the richness and diversity of the African American experience, what it means to their lives and how it helped us shape this nation. A place that transcends the boundaries of race and culture that divide us, and becomes a lens into a story that unites us all.