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Education and Storytelling Are at the Center of Jordan Brand’s Next Grants for the Black Community

Roughly one year ago, Jordan Brand and Michael Jordan announced a plan to donate $100 million over the next 10 years to organizations that promote racial equality, social justice and greater access to education. Today, the NBA icon’s namesake label revealed the destinations for its next three multiyear grants. Jordan Brand’s grant for The National Museum of African American History and Culture will go toward helping expand its Talking About Race web portal and Let’s Talk speaker series. “At the museum, we tell stories that are complex and meaningful, stories that have often been silenced from our past,” National Museum of African American History and Culture director Kevin Young said in a statement. “More than ever, we need those stories to highlight and emphasize the centrality of the African American experience to our nation’s history and healing.”
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‘Smithsonian Anthology Of Hip-Hop And Rap’ Set For Release With 129 Songs & 300-Page Book

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture partnered with Smithsonian Folkways Recordings to create the Smithsonian Anthology of Hip-Hop and Rap. The box set chronicles Hip Hop’s cultural impact from 1979 to 2013.
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National History Day Students Named for Smithsonian Documentary Showcase (Press Release)

National History Day® (NHD), the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), and the Smithsonian Learning Lab are pleased to announce the global premier of 33 documentary films, to be featured in an online showcase. The films were produced by middle and high school students competing in the 2021 NHD National Contest and were screened and selected by NMAAHC staff.
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Secretary Lonnie Bunch Reflects on the Smithsonian’s 175th Birthday

Perhaps nothing speaks to our future like the two new museums on the horizon—the Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum and the National Museum of the American Latino. With the successes of the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the National Museum of the American Indian, we learned that telling the American story through different lenses serves all our audiences better, regardless of background or experience. These next museums will help the Smithsonian represent the American experience more fully.
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Cmdr. Merle Smith, first Black graduate of Coast Guard Academy, dies at 76

Cmdr. Merle James Smith Jr., the first Black cadet to graduate from the Coast Guard Academy and the first African American officer to command a U.S. warship in close quarters combat, died last Wednesday. He was 76. The academy announced last year it is renaming its Military Officers Club after Smith, and Kelly said the academy will formally dedicate the Cmdr. Merle J. Smith Consolidated Club on Oct. 1. Smith also is featured in the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.
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Juneteenth Becomes US Federal Holiday

Kelly Elaine Navies, a museum specialist and oral historian at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, explains that General Gordon Granger arrived in the city of Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865. He was accompanied by 1,800 Union troops, many of whom were United States Colored Troops, and he announced General Order No. 3, which notified Texans that all enslaved people were no longer in bondage.
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Grandmother of Juneteenth' celebrates federal holiday -- but there is more work to do. Here's how you can help

The National Museum of African American History & Culture is hosting an online celebration called, Juneteenth: A Celebration of Resistance. According to their website, the virtual viewing spans two days from June 19 to June 20. For added education and awareness, the museum also put together an interactive timeline that walks online users through the history of Juneteenth and its significance today.
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How To Explain Juneteenth To Your Kids — With Joy & Truth

Take all the help you can get from books and homeschool projects that detail what this time was like in history. Find sources that aren’t whitewashed, and offer the full truth behind the actions of white supremacists, like starting a Civil War in a fight to keep the institution of slavery. The National Museum of African American History and Culture offers a lot of useful resources.
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Congress makes Juneteenth a federal holiday, House passes bill after Senate

Juneteenth is officially a federal paid holiday in the United States. After passing in the Senate on Tuesday, the House voted on the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act on Wednesday evening and passed it. The bill now heads to President Joe Biden’s desk to be signed into law, CNN reports. The National Museum of African American History and Culture has long asserted that Juneteenth is the nation’s Second Independence Day and it will finally be recognized as such.
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In One Modest Cotton Sack, a Remarkable Story of Slavery, Suffering, Love and Survival

“All That She Carried,” a new book about women and chattel slavery as framed by a single object: a cotton sack that dates back to the mid-19th century, given by an enslaved woman named Rose to her daughter Ashley. The artifact now known as Ashley’s sack is currently on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, on loan from Middleton Place in South Carolina, where so many viewers started weeping that the curator handed out tissues beside the display.
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