A century after the Tulsa Race Massacre, people continue to learn about, struggle with, and work to repair the horrific damage done.

The voices of survivors and their descendants are central to this work of fighting for social justice.

They are pushing the city and the nation to face a more truthful understanding of the past.  Their acts of bearing witness are indispensable.

This video features survivors of the Tulsa Race Massacre recalling their experiences on that day and after. Included are Olivia Hooker, Eldoris McCondichie, Jimmie Lily Franklin, Eunice Jackson, Clyde Eddy, and John Hope Franklin. The voices of survivors bearing witness to this history have pushed the city and the nation toward a more truthful understanding of the past. Their act of bearing witness is an indispensable element of justice and reconciliation.

Gift of The Tulsa Project, Inc. (Reginald Turner, J.D. Clement & The Lomax Company)

Survivors of the Tulsa Race Massacre

John Hope Franklin. man standing under an overpass.
John Hope Franklin. Gift of the photographer, Don Thompson, © Don Thompson
Eunice Jackson seated in chair with table on her right.
Eunice Jackson. Gift of the photographer, Don Thompson, © Don Thompson.
Robert Fairchild seated in church
Robert Fairchild. Gift of the photographer, Don Thompson, © Don Thompson.
Laverne Davis seated in chair at desk.
Laverne Davis. Gift of the photographer, Don Thompson, © Don Thompson.
Chaptman Ferguson outside seated on a park table.
Chaptman Ferguson. Gift of the photographer, Don Thompson, © Don Thompson.
Augusta Mann seated at table.
Augusta Mann. Gift of the photographer, Don Thompson, © Don Thompson.
Alice Andrews seated at piano.
Alice Andrews. Gift of the photographer, Don Thompson, © Don Thompson.
Whatever you do, it must be done in the spirit of goodwill and mutual respect, and even love. How else can we overcome the past and be worthy of our forebears and face the future with confidence and hope? John Hope Franklin

Urban Renewal, 1960s

During the 1960s and 1970s highway construction cut through the heart of the rebuilt Greenwood business district. Other businesses and homes were lost to urban renewal projects. The result was increased segregation and deepening poverty in the areas affected by the riot.

Greenwood, 1970s

Across the decades, black institutions—including the Oklahoma Eagle newspaper—remained stalwarts of the community. The Greenwood Cultural Center and Mabel B. Little House have showcased the heritage of the community since the 1990s. In 2010 the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park opened in Greenwood to help memorialize and educate the community.

Explore More on Tulsa

 

Before the Massacre

During the Massacre


Ragan's PR Daily Award Honorable Mention

View The Collection

Pinback button promoting reparations for the Tulsa Race Massacre

View Object about Pinback button promoting reparations for the Tulsa Race Massacre

"Riot penny" charred during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

View Object about "Riot penny" charred during the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

Placard calling for reparations for the Tulsa Race Massacre

View Object about Placard calling for reparations for the Tulsa Race Massacre
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