Displaying 1 - 10 of 316 stories
Transatlantic Commuter

At Home and Abroad

Because he returned frequently to the United States to work, visit family, and engage in activism, Baldwin referred to himself as a “transatlantic commuter.”
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Transatlantic Commuter

Escape From America

Constrained by racial violence, homophobia, and financial difficulties, Baldwin sought physical and psychological distance abroad to pursue his craft.
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Their Words Live On: Remembering the Fallen Heroes of 2021

As 2022 approaches, we here at the National Museum of African American history and Culture pause to reflect on the lives of those we have lost in 2021. As we mourn their passing we must also preserve the incalculable contributions they have made to American history through their deeds and words.
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Collection Story

A Heritage of Design

Design shapes almost everything we as human do. Designers give form to our actions—how we sit in a chair, how we turn a lamp on and off, how we move between rooms in a home. Similarly, our virtual spaces and interactions are products of design. We rely on design to communicate with each other using the typography, graphics, and webpages you are now viewing.
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Our American Story

The Bronze Stars of Korean War Veteran Edward Theodore Taylor

I reflect on the 600,000+ African Americans who served in Korea and on those who received medals for their valor in this nation’s first desegregated war. I then celebrate in my mind my six decades of engagement in civil rights and public education that followed my return home from Korea. I learned the hard way that service in the U. S. military did not guarantee an African American full citizenship, that the struggle for respect and equality had to be fought on numerous other fronts, and that this battle would remain ongoing.
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Collection Story

(Re)Creating the Narrative

Black women writers have consistently been a part of the cultural renaissances that have reshaped Black culture, nationally and globally. The work of Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and Maya Angelou are just a few examples of the many women writers who have contributed to the project of creation and recovery known as the Black Women’s Literary Renaissance of the 1970s.
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Collection Story

Joe Louis’ Sacrifice and Service for Equality

Joe Louis’ contributions to society, the war effort, and racial equality embody the efforts of African American servicemembers during World War II, as they fought a battle on two fronts: against foreign fascism and domestic white supremacy.
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Collection Story

Showstoppers!

The Cathrell Collection presents not only a diverse picture of the jazz scene of the 1930s and 1940s, but also shines a spotlight on the careers of chorines whose high-energy performances have been overlooked. Through the journeys of three chorines represented in this collection, Laurie Cathrell (1914–1999), Birdie Warfield (ca. 1916–unknown), and Chickie Collins (ca. 1915–1942), one can see that chorines were not merely ornamentation for big bands, but talented, ambitious performers in their own rights.
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Transatlantic Commuter

Lessons on Life and Literature

Living abroad helped to shape Baldwin’s personal identity and spawn his literary output.
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Captain Hannibal C. Carter: Businessman, Civil War Officer, Reconstruction Politician, Freedom Fighter

The life of abolitionist, politician, and war veteran Hannibal C. Carter (1835-1904) was filled with both promise and daunting challenge during a radically transformative period in American History. Despite being born during the time of slavery, his parents, George Washington Carter and Ann Hill Carter, were business owners and prominent members of a free Black community in New Albany, Indiana.
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