Juneteenth Commemorative Collection. Available for a limited time only! Shop Now

Juneteenth is a time to gather as a family, reflect on the past and look to the future. Discover ways to celebrate this African American cultural tradition of music, food and freedom. 

Virtual Programs

Generously supported by Ford Motor Company

Secretary Lonnie G. Bunch III speaking about the Emancipation Proclamation
Juneteenth: Connecting the Historic to the Now
The Robert F. Smith Family History Center presents Exploring Reverse Genealogy
Juneteenth and Culinary History – A Conversation between Adrian Miller and Kevin Young
Juneteenth Porch Stories
Community Soundstage: A Conversation with Amythyst Kiah and Dwandolyn Reece

What is Juneteenth?

On June 19, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas. He informed the enslaved African Americans of their freedom and that the Civil War had ended. This momentous occasion has been celebrated as Juneteenth — a combination of June and 19 — for over 150 years.

We will begin this celebration with a rendition of the Negro National Anthem, "Lift Every Voice and Sing."

Rochelle Rice sings "Lift Every Voice and Sing."

Find Your Ancestors

Research African American family history beyond 1870 into the era of slavery. 

Manuscript of Emancipation Proclamation on card 1863-1880s
Manuscript of Emancipation Proclamation on card, 1863-1880s
Die-cut oval photographic montage of the makers of the 13th Amendment ca. 1865
Die-cut oval photographic montage of the makers of the 13th Amendment ca. 1865
A Bill Providing for the celebration of the semicentennial anniversary of the Act of emancipation, and for other purposes.
A Bill Providing for the celebration of the semicentennial anniversary of the Act of emancipation, and for other purposes.
The Proclamation of Emancipation by the President of the United States, to take effect January 1st, 1863
The Proclamation of Emancipation by the President of the United States, to take effect January 1st, 1863, 1862

A Juneteenth Feast

Breaking bread with loved ones is an important part of African American culture, and Juneteenth is no different. These selected recipes reflect the holiday’s Texas roots.

Photographic slide of the Poor People's Campaign

Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, © Robert Houston

I spoke with my grandma to get a sense of the ideal Juneteenth menu. My grandmother drew on her memories as a child and June outdoor meals that her church and community group have every year. She stated the menu should consist of easily prepared foods that can sit outside for an extended period without going bad such as salads and pickled side dishes.

Leslie Walker
Manager of Social Justice and Scholarly Programs (NMAAHC)

Share Your Story

Your history is American history.
Share stories of people, places and moments that shape your community this Juneteenth.

Join the Community

Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Princetta R. Newman

Children & Youth Activities

Early Childhood

Discover Juneteenth resources to share with young children.

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Secondary Education

Create an interpretive playlist of Juneteenth celebrations. 

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Resources

Juneteenth Reading List

Discover more about the history of Juneteenth and African American cultural traditions with a summer reading list curated by the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

View the List about Juneteenth Reading List
Social Media Toolkit

Social Media Toolkit

Celebrate Juneteenth with the museum on social!

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Limited Edition Collection ends July 9th

Limited Edition Collection ends July 9th

Help represent this holiday with products that honor Juneteenth as celebrated for over 150 years, in support of the museum.

Shop Now about Limited Edition Collection ends July 9th
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