Talking About Race

Talking about race is not easy, although hard, is necessary. We are here to provide tools and guidance to empower your journey and inspire conversation.

A lifelong journey

Talking about race starts with personal reflection:

  • When were you first aware of your race?
  • What do you remember from childhood about how you made sense of human differences? What confused you?
  • What childhood experiences did you have with friends or adults who were different from you in some way?
  • How, if ever, did any adult give you help thinking about racial differences?

Why talking about race matters

Help the fight against prejudice & racism.
Build the sense of identity & self.
Celebrate the diversity of humanity.

Who Am I?

African American man representing an educator and a group of children in discussion

I Am an Educator

Whether you are teaching infants, adults, or any age in between, you are an influential part of your students’ learning and development. Educators too have an important role in communicating our history and culture. What and how the history of race in America is presented is an opportunity to engage in thoughtful, respectful, and productive conversations. Start, continue, or expand the conversation with us.

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A man and young child representing a parent and their child

I Am a Parent or Caregiver

There’s no quick or foolproof way to talk about the complexities of race with your child(ren). But, it’s a conversation all families need to have, no matter your race, background, education or experience. Let’s get started, continue, or expand the conversation together.

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Young women representing a person committed to equity

I Am a Person Committed to Equity

You care about making the world a more equitable and just place for all. You may just be starting to think about your role and ability to impact others, or, you may be further along on your journey. Wherever you are, what you do and say matters. Explore how to speak and engage constructively about race, so we can all grow together.

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I want to know

Start your journey by exploring one of the Talking About Race topics.

Talking About Race: Community Building

Community Building

Community building is something we do together to share perspectives, create brave space, and foster relationships. We are members of a community dedicated to ending racism. Let’s build a national community and grow your local one.
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Talking About Race: Race and Racial Identity

Race and Racial Identity

The scientific consensus is that race has no biological basis – that we are all one race, the human race. Racialized identity, however, is very real. And, in a racialized society, everyone is assigned a racial identity whether you are aware of it or not. Let’s broaden our awareness.
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Talking About Race: Being Antiracist

Being Antiracist

No one is born racist or antiracist; these result from the choices we make. Being antiracist results from a conscious decision to make frequent, consistent, equitable choices daily. These choices require ongoing self-awareness and self-reflection as we move through life. In the absence of making antiracist choices, we (un)consciously uphold aspects of white supremacy, white-dominant culture, and unequal institutions and society. Being racist or antiracist is not about who you are; it is about what you do.
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Resources

Racial Healing Handbook-Being Antiracist

This handout is from the "Racial Healing Handbook: Practical Activities to Help You Challenge Privilege, Confront Systemic Racism, and Engage in Collective Healing" by Anneliese A. Singh, Ph.D., LPC

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The Color Line

Teaching Activity. By Bill Bigelow. A lesson on the countless colonial laws enacted to create division and inequality based on race. This helps students understand the origins of racism in the United States and who benefits.

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