The NMAAHC Museum Site

The 5-acre site of the National Museum of African American History and Culture was once part of an 800-acre tobacco plantation owned by Notley Young (1736–1802), on which 245 Africans were enslaved, according to the U.S. Census of 1790. The U.S. government purchased Young’s land in 1791 in order to start laying out the new capital of Washington, D.C.

National Museum of African American History and Culture grounds. The Washington Monument is seen in the background.

The Young family’s plantation house was built ca. 1756 and demolished roughly 100 years later. It was located near current-day G Street, between 9th and 10th Streets, within what is now Benjamin Banneker Park, named for the African American astronomer, engineer, and mathematician who helped survey and plan the new federal city.