Hidden Herstory Social Media Toolkit

Ideas for sharing Women's History Month with the National Museum of African American History and Culture

We are so excited to celebrate Women’s History Month at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture with you! This toolkit will give you a chance to let your friends, fans and followers know about the rich contributions of African American women to history and culture from your unique and creative point of view. The copy and content suggestions below are just a starting point, so feel free to put your own spin on it! Please join in using #HiddenHerstory to uplift these undertold stories of women in history. This toolkit will be updated throughout the month.

#HiddenHerstory Campaign Overview

  • This #WomensHistoryMonth, join @nmaahc to learn more about the historical contributions of women. Follow #HiddenHerstory all month long!

  • Join me in celebrating #WomensHistoryMonth with @nmaahc! Follow #HiddenHerstory to find stories of unsung women. 

Annie Turnbo Malone

  • In 1917, Annie Turnbo Malone opened Poro College, the 1st institution devoted to the study & teaching of black cosmetology. #HiddenHerstory

Daisy Bates

  • As an organizer, Daisy Bates led several efforts to desegregate Arkansas buses and public schools. #HiddenHerstory

Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin

  • In 1894, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin founded The Woman's Era, the 1st national newspaper published by and for AA women. #HiddenHerstory

Claudette Colvin

  • Claudette Colvin was a teen who stood up for civil rights and helped launch the Montgomery Bus Boycott. #HiddenHerstory.

#HiddenHerstory Campaign Overview

  • The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is celebrating Women’s History Month with a social media campaign that focuses on the unsung contributions of women. Learn more about the historical contributions of women by following #HiddenHerstory all month long!

  • Join me in celebrating #WomensHistoryMonth with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). Follow #HiddenHerstory to find stories of unsung women.

Celebrating Claudette Colvin as a Teen Activist

  • On March 2, 1955, 15-year-old Claudette Colvin refused to give up her seat on a segregated Montgomery bus nine days before Rosa Parks. The 15-year-old was among the five women originally included in the federal court case challenging Montgomery's bus segregation law. On December 17, 1956, the Supreme Court determined that bus segregation in Alabama was unconstitutional. #HiddenHerstory

Celebrating Annie Turnbo Malone as an Entrepreneur and Innovator

  • Annie Turnbo Malone became interested in styling and straightening African American hair with her knowledge of chemistry and herbs. She developed The Great Wonderful Hair Grower and the Poro Method to revolutionize hair care. Armed with a team of assistants, she started selling her products door-to-door. In 1917, Malone opened the Poro College in St. Louis, the first institution devoted to the study and teaching of black cosmetology. The school had over 75,000 trained agents worldwide; including Madam C.J. Walker, who began her career as one of Malone’s Poro agents. #HiddenHerstory

Celebrating Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin and the Women’s Era

  • In 1894, Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin founded The Woman's Era, the first national newspaper published by and for African American women. The newspaper was significant outlet for African American women's clubs and Ruffin served as editor and publisher until 1897. #HiddenHerstory

Celebrating Daisy Bates as an Organizer

  • Daisy Bates led several efforts to desegregate Arkansas buses and public schools. She was elected president of the Arkansas NAACP in 1952, and was inspired to focus on education after the Brown v. Board ruling. Bates played a significant role in the integration of the Little Rock Central High School in 1957, organizing and mentoring the “Little Rock Nine.” #HiddenHerstory