A People’s Journey, A Nation’s Story

Welcome to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture

Opening Information for Visitors
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Visiting the Museum

Open Wednesday through Sunday
11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Closed December 25 and January 20, 2021

The Museum will be closed to the public on Monday and Tuesday during the initial reopening phase.  
 
Admission is free. Timed-entry passes are required for all visitors, regardless of age. 
Museum Address
1400 Constitution Ave NW,
Washington, DC 20560
Ph. 1-844-750-3012
How do I reserve timed-entry passes?
  • A limited number of passes are available. 
  • Visitors can reserve passes up to 30 days in advance. 
  • Passes are released throughout each day beginning at 11:00 a.m. ET.  
  • Visitors can reserve up to six passes maximum. 
  • Passes are no longer released three months in advance.
  • Passes may not be sold or transferred.

Plan Your Visit

The Fight for Voting Rights

In 1870, the 15th Amendment declared that states could not deny the right to vote “on account of race, color or previous condition of servitude.” But for African Americans, the fight for equal voting rights had only just begun.
Struggle to Secure the Promise of the 15th Amendment
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150 Years and Counting

Explore how African Americans have led the fight for voting rights for all Americans from Reconstruction to today.
Read Story

Five African American suffragists
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African American Suffragists

The women's suffrage movement had many heroines who bravely fought for the rights of women in the United States. Here are the stories of five African American suffragists who helped women in America secure the right to vote.
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Frances M. Albrier: A Champion of Voter Rights

The life of west coast activist Frances M. Albrier (1898-1987) brings into sharp focus the unsung role of Californians in the early fight for American civil, labor and human rights. The granddaughter of formerly enslaved people, Albrier moved to Berkeley, California, from Alabama in 1920, beginning nearly six decades of community activism while working as a nurse, maid and union organizer.
Read Story

Explore the Collection

Discover signature objects from the Museum's collection
Carte-de-visite of Sojourner Truth, 1863

Carte-de-visite of Sojourner Truth, 1863

Sojourner Truth seated with a daguerreotype of her grandson, James Caldwell of Co. H, 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, on her lap
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Radical Members of the South Carolina Legislature, 1868

Radical Members of the South Carolina Legislature, 1868

A carte-de-visite of sixty-four (64) so-called "Radical" members of the reconstructed South Carolina legislature after the Civil War
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The Fifteenth Amendment. Celebrated May 19th 1870

The Fifteenth Amendment. Celebrated May 19th 1870

At center, a depiction of a parade in celebration of the passing of the 15th Amendment
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Lithographic print of Hiram Revels, ca. 1870

Lithographic print of Hiram Revels, ca. 1870

A lithographic print of Hiram Revels from Frank Leslie’s Illustrirte Zeitung
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Cabinet card portrait of Thomas Mundy Peterson, 1884

Cabinet card portrait of Thomas Mundy Peterson, 1884

Peterson became the first African American to cast a ballot in a U.S. election under the provisions of the 15th Amendment
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Black and white photograph of Mary Church Terrell

Gelatin silver print of Mary Church Terrell, ca. 1910

Black and white photograph of Mary Church Terrell
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National Association of Colored Women's Convention Delegate's badge, ca. 1914

National Association of Colored Women's Convention Delegate's badge, ca. 1914

Worn by Mamie Williams, the first African American woman appointed to the National Committee of the Republic Party
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Flyer promoting the Citizenship Education Project, 1956

Flyer promoting the Citizenship Education Project, 1956

Document part of a scrapbook that was compiled in 1956 and 1957 by Frances Albrier during her term as president of the San Francisco Chapter of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW)
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Pinback button for SNCC's One Man One Vote campaign, ca. 1965

Pinback button for SNCC's One Man One Vote campaign, ca. 1965

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee pin back button
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Magazine clipping showing an image of Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act

Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1965 Voting Rights Act

Magazine clipping showing an image of Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act
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Copy of H.R. 6400, a bill before the House of Representatives that purports to enforce the fifteenth amendment of the U.S. Constitution

Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1965 Voting Rights Act

Copy of H.R. 6400, a bill before the House of Representatives that purports to enforce the fifteenth amendment of the U.S. Constitution
View Object
Pen used to sign the legislation with "The President - The White House" molded into the clear handle in white lettering

Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1965 Voting Rights Act

Pen used to sign the legislation with "The President - The White House" molded into the clear handle in white lettering
View Object
Carte-de-visite of Sojourner Truth, 1863
Radical Members of the South Carolina Legislature, 1868
The Fifteenth Amendment. Celebrated May 19th 1870
Lithographic print of Hiram Revels, ca. 1870
Cabinet card portrait of Thomas Mundy Peterson, 1884
Black and white photograph of Mary Church Terrell
National Association of Colored Women's Convention Delegate's badge, ca. 1914
Flyer promoting the Citizenship Education Project, 1956
Pinback button for SNCC's One Man One Vote campaign, ca. 1965
Magazine clipping showing an image of Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act
Copy of H.R. 6400, a bill before the House of Representatives that purports to enforce the fifteenth amendment of the U.S. Constitution
Pen used to sign the legislation with "The President - The White House" molded into the clear handle in white lettering

The African American experience is the lens through which we understand what it is to be an American.

Lonnie G. Bunch III Founding Director, NMAAHC

COVID-19 is an extremely contagious disease that is believed to mainly spread  from  person-to-person contact. The Smithsonian  is doing its part to mitigate transmission intensity, and we ask you, our  visitors,  to do the same and help us reduce the spread of COVID-19. You must follow all posted instructions while visiting the Smithsonian, including instructions about wearing face coverings and social distancing. Despite these measures, the risk of contracting COVID-19 could increase by visiting the Smithsonian. By visiting the Smithsonian, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19.   

The Smithsonian reserves the right to modify its hours of operations, capacity,  or  visitor guidelines as circumstances require  and  to  deny entry or access to any person who fails to follow these guidelines or whose conduct puts Smithsonian staff, visitors, or property at risk.