A People’s Journey, A Nation’s Story

Welcome to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture

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As a public health precaution due to COVID-19 (coronavirus), the National Museum of African American History and Culture will temporarily close to the public starting Saturday, March 14. We are not announcing a re-opening date at this time and will provide updates on a regular and as needed basis.

All public events, programming and gatherings are canceled. Please visit our calendar of events for the latest updates. Our visitor passes page has updated information about individual and group passes.  We appreciate your understanding.

Engage with NMAAHC Online

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NMAAHC Digital Resources Guide

Explore, learn and engage with the National Museum of African American History and Culture through our numerous digital resources.
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Celebrate Poetry and Jazz Appreciation Month

Featured Exhibition

Chez Baldwin

James Baldwin’s house in the South of France serves as a powerful lens to explore his life and works. From 1971 to 1987, his home in St. Paul de Vence was his permanent, vibrant abode and an important social center for artists and intellectuals from Europe, Africa, America, and around the world.
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Watch Our Past Event, NMAAHC Live -Honoring The Centennial Of Nat King Cole

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On March 16, 2019 The National Museum of African American History and Culture hosted a celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the birth of Nat King Cole with a panel discussion and select musical performances to honor and celebrate the towering musical genius. At the height of his career, Cole was praised for his elegant tone. Millions of Americans, from every walk of life, listened to his music to enjoy themes of uplift, optimism and romance.

A black-and-white photograph of Hazel Scott and Paul Robeson in a New York City club. Scott plays the piano and sings into a microphone.
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The Women Behind the Music

Jazz evolved from ragtime, an American style of syncopated instrumental music. Jazz first materialized in New Orleans, and is often distinguished by African American musical innovation. Multiple styles of the genre exist today from the dance-oriented music of the 1920s big band era to the experimental flair of modern avant-garde jazz.
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Explore the Collection

Discover signature objects from the Museum's collection
Photograph of Billie Holiday

Photograph of Billie Holiday

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"Pudgy" trumpet owned by Dizzy Gillespie

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Upright acoustic double bass owned by Stanley Clarke

Upright acoustic double bass owned by Stanley Clarke

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The African American experience is the lens through which we understand what it is to be an American.

Lonnie G. Bunch III Founding Director, NMAAHC