Rooted in the Land

Explore the history of Black neighborhoods - communities they served, the land that was loss, and the next generation’s role in salvaging it

The Roots of Greenwood

The Greenwood District of Tulsa, Oklahoma has a history that is rooted in the history of Black settlements and towns in 19th century Oklahoma and a wider geography of communities of freedom that stretch far and wide across the continent for hundreds of years.
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A view of a street in Tulsa with horses, cars, and buildings.

Remembering Tulsa

In late May 1921, the thriving African American community of Greenwood in Tulsa, Oklahoma, suffered one of the deadliest racial massacres in U.S. history.
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Man And Woman Embracing Through An Open Car Window, Gift from Charles A. Harris and Beatrice Harris in memory of Charles "Teenie" Harris

Traveling Through Jim Crow America

To find safe and friendly accommodations during the segregation era, Black travelers relied on a network of shared advice, exchanged by word of mouth and also published in travel guides such as the "Green Book."
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View of an exhibition display of a porch on Oak Bluffs

Black Geographies

A close look at spaces African Americans have inhabited and fought for can deepen our understanding of the connections between race, space, and place.
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A detail of a photo of protestors around a barrel of hazardous material and an individual in a haz-mat suite.

An Artist Forged in a Steel Mill Town

Raised in the collapsed steel mill town of Braddock, Pennsylvania, LaToya Ruby Frazier’s empathy, humanism, commitment to social and environmental justice, and artistic sensibilities were forged by what she witnessed around her from a young age.
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Photograph of Louis Armstrong recording at the CBS Studio in New York

A New African American Identity: The Harlem Renaissance

The Great Migration drew to Harlem some of the greatest minds and brightest talents of the day, an astonishing array of African American artists and scholars.
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How George Floyd's Death Became A Catalyst for Change

One year after the killing of George Floyd, the National Museum of African American History and Culture reflects on the incidents of last summer in what was the largest collective protest ever on U.S. soil. Today, we memorialize George Floyd and so many others whose lives ended tragically and abruptly.
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African Americans in the White House: 1900s - 2021

In celebration of the inauguration of Joseph R. Biden Jr, as the 46th President of the United States, and the inauguration of America’s first black woman vice president, Kamala Harris, we continue to honor the contribution of African Americans in the White House.
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A Brief History of Voguing

Historical scholarship has unearthed a world of saloons, cabarets, speakeasies, rent parties, and drag balls that existed since the late 1800’s as spaces where LGBTQ identities were not only visible, but openly celebrated.
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A People's Journey, A Nation's Story

From Harriet Tubman to Black Lives Matter, journey with us as we celebrate American history through the African American lens.
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